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Intervalometer blocks the camera for too long - how to get around it?

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#21 bonanzaman
Vielen dank, Günther!

I wonder if the same could be accomplished on Nikon by just installing a mono plug instead of a stereo one ....that way, the cross connection could happen inside of a replacement plug (solder on)....could be a bit neater!

Mark
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#22 gwegner
Feel free to try it, and let us know!
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#23 woutervdhoogen
Hi mikeorso (few posts back),

From the looks of it there is some writing near the soldered wires on the board. Hard to read from the picture but it looks like the middle somewhat looks like it says AF? This could help you in deciding which is the AF, Ground and Trigger wire.

Hope it helps and let the other Sony users know if there was sensible lettering in your intervalometer. Lucky me I use a Nikon and Gunther did the hard work for us :-)

Wouter
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#24 steinardo
I just tried this on the Aputure TR3C for my EOS 40D. Turns out that it does not work to simply cut the focus wire. When you short the focus to gnd, the autofocus initiates as expected. But when shorting the shutter alone to ground, the autfocus initiates and when in focus the shutter is executed. Tried shorting all 3 connectors, but that did not make a difference.

Anyone figured this one out?

Ref: http://www.doc-diy.net/photo/eos_wired_remote/
Sad
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#25 NightRail
I use Pentax cameras, and I've been watching this thread with interest, as whenever I tried a sequence with a short interval, it would start dropping frames after a while. I watched the video, but Pentax don't appear to show any buffer details, like on the Nikon in the video. So for a trial I fitted an auto-focus lens, and set the camera to continuous auto-focus. It was clear the camera was receiving the focus signal for every exposure, as the lens was trying to focus each time. I purchased a spare cable and set about carrying out the modification, it soon became apparent that with such small cables involved I wouldn't be able to make a reliable job of it. With a Pentax camera, the plug that fits the camera and the intervalometer is exactly the same, so I purchased a cable fitted with mono plugs. In a test, using a 1 second interval, it fired off 300 exposures without a single dropped frame. One effect of using a mono cable is it blanks out the rear screen, so it wouldn't be any good for a holy grail shoot, but I wouldn't be using such a short interval. So I will use the normal cable for a holy grail shoot, and the mono cable for everything else. I always use manual lenses for timelapse, for which Pentax cameras are well suited.
I don't know where the smilie came from.
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#26 chasg
Hi Macronencer,

I've just successfully rewired a Sony remote cable. It needed the "ground to release" joining as for Nikon, as Gunther described (I tested carefully, my A7II would not fire unless the ground was attached to the release wire).

Gunther, regarding my post about my Sony A7II and problems with changing exposure settings during qDSLRDashboard Holy Grail sequences, the cable-hack didn't help :-( Worth a try though, thanks again for the blog post. What I've resorted to doing is stopping the remote, changing the camera settings, and then activating the remote again. I can usually do it within the 2 second gap between an 8 second exposure and the end of a 10 second interval, so the most variance I think I'll be getting is a second or so, which, hopefully, won't be noticeable in the final movie (this does confirm the Sony is still getting some sort of signal from the remote while it's attached, even in the gap between shot and end of interval).

Cheers!

Chas
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#27 gwegner
Hi Chas, thanks for sharing your experiments. So the modification for Sony has to be like it goes for Nikon, I will add this to my blog post.
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#28 chasg
Happy to give back for once :-)
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#29 Pada
Hi, I followed the approach to open the housing and unsolder the AF cable and connect it to the release pad.
This is because I dont have a replaceable cable and didn't want to ruin it. And is was quicker to do than the cable thing.
Sure with a replaceable cable you can quickly change if you want the AF via remote, but how often that is needed?
So everyone could choose his favorite solution. By the way, I did it with this remote for Nikon.

Thanks Gunther to find out how to get rid of the blocking.
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#30 Gazz
Hi All

I've just tried this intervalometer hack on 2 intervalometers without success. I'm using a genuine canon intervalometer and cheap ebay job, couldn't get either of them to work with the 6D or 5Dmk3. Everytime I disabled the autofocus wire as described in the article the shutter would not release anymore ? Any idea where I am going wrong ?

Thanks

G

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