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Long focal length

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#1 Chris 81
Hi,
I have a question about shooting with a telephoto lens.

I tried shooting some sequences with a 300mm focal length. I did not use any motion control device.
I only tried it in bright daylight. So the shutter speed is not the problem. Every single image is really sharp.
After editing, the sequence is quite shaky and I believe that even if the single images are sharp, the camera is moving very slightly in between the shots. I am using the Nikon 300 2.8. So the setup is quite heavy.

The question is, is there any possibility to align the images at one stage during the editing workflow? Something like the aligning option in photoshop when doing exposure blends...

Thanks a lot for your help.

Chris
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#2 gwegner
Did you turn off the VR (Vibration Reduction) on the lens? If not, that's what causes this issue. From a tripod you always need to turn VR off.
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#3 Chris 81
Yes its turned off.
I tried doing some long exposure shots to check if they are sharp. Same problem. The images are not really sharp.
I think even if i don't really feel any wind, that at those focal lengths a tiny bit of movement in the air is causing that problem.
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#4 c_joerg
I have the same problem with a focal length of 250mm 400mm equivalent focal length). The tripod is very stable and the IS is off. I suspect that the structure is vibrated by the mechanical shutter. There probably only helps a stabilization in video processing.
I am not sure if it would help to support the lens at the end...

https://youtu.be/Cljd3Lzi21M
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#5 gwegner
Also using the delay feature in the camera which flips the mirror one second before releasing, is a good idea. If the camera has electronic shutter, also try that to minimize any vibration. Tele-lenses should be mounted on a lens collar, not at the camera. All this helps to minimize shaking.
But as Chris wrote, it could also be turbulences in the air which make the images look a bit blurry.
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#6 c_joerg
Quote:Also using the delay feature in the camera which flips the mirror one second before releasing, is a good idea.

If have no mirror..

Quote:Tele-lenses should be mounted on a lens collar, not at the camera. All this helps to minimize shaking.

I am using the connector on my EF / EF-M adapter. Lens collar would be the last option…

Quote:But as Chris wrote, it could also be turbulences in the air which make the images look a bit blurry..
You cannot rule that out…
But I have already made a number of shots, even in the vicinity of a bird's nest. There I can rule that out.
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#7 gwegner
If you are on a mirrorless try electronic shutter, this should eliminate any mechanical shake in the camera.
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#8 c_joerg
Unfortunately, my cameras have no electronic shutter Sad
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#9 gwegner
From what I see in your video that looks like athmospheric distortions.
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#10 c_joerg
What you still see are definitely athmospheric distortions. The video is already stabilized with Adobe Premiere...

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