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really impressed with Premiere time-remapping "optical flow"

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#1 chasg
I recently shot a 30 minute timelapse for a client (not a typo, it's 45,000 photos). The client asked, after I delivered, if I could slow it down. Yikes.

(note: I did send the client several test clips to determine the speed they wanted before I started the project, they just decided, after delivery, that they wanted it slower)

I despaired, I was seriously worried that I wouldn't be able to do what they wanted, but...Premiere came through, and I'm quite amazed at what a good a job it did.

It was a simple process: right-click on the source movie, set speed to something slower (after testing, we decided that 60% of original speed looked good with the subject matter), set Time Interpolation to Optical Flow, and let it render (and render and render... ;-)

The quality is good enough that I may choose, in the future, to shoot at a higher rate and slow down in post (sometimes the shooting interval needed for a particular subject is too fast for my intervalometer or camera).

Just thought I'd give Optical Flow a shoutout.

Cheers!

Chas
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#2 gwegner
Yes, unfortunately "Optical flow" often introduces artifacts. I prefer to use the "frame blending" option for timelapse, you should give that a try also.
Of course, nothing can beat shorter intervals when shooting. I always prefer to have slower timelapse. Accelerating is always possible without any losses.
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#3 chasg
I did a comprehensive test with both optical flow and frame blending on a 1 minute 6K sequence (rendering slowed-down versions at 95% speed, 90%, 95% etc, down to 45%). The subject matter seemed to suit the optical flow method better, but I will test both methods again for any future slow-downs.

And I would have *loved* to shoot with shorter intervals, but the shortest I could go without risking buffer overruns was a 3-second interval (I didn't shoot all 45K photos in one go, but I did do one 24-hour non-stop session _and_ a 48-hour non-stop session). Plus, night-time exposures were 2".

Thanks for the info, I really appreciate it.
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#4 gwegner
You should try the LRT Pro Timer Free or at least the intervalometer hack to prevent the buffer from filling and enably shorter intervals.

https://lrtimelapse.com/lrtimelapse-pro-timer-free/
https://lrtimelapse.com/news/intervalometer-hack/
Check out my e-book Time Lapse Shooting and Processing!
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lrtimelapse.com - advanced Time Lapse Photography made easy!
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#5 chasg
I've been considering building your intervalometer for a while now :-)

But I have at least been using altered intervalometer cables for since you first posted about them (I'm the one who posted that the Sony alteration should be the same as the Nikon).

...also check out: