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Settings for residential furnishing timelapse

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#1 Krimolvig
Im working on a project for a customer, planing to shoot next week. The customer want a timelapse of them "styling" up or furnishing a new residential. It will take about an hour or so to finish a room. My question is, as I never recorded anything like this, what settings to use?

I've found this, which probably is what Im looking for regarding the final results; https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZNB08HiyvKI
What settings do you think they've used in this video? Intervall and most of all shutter speed? I just love the smooth movement in this video, it's not choppy as much else in "crowd" based timelapses.
What shutter speed should I use to get this small motion blur effect?

Will LRT handle this with the motion blur if I shoot with fast shutter and freeze every movement?
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Kristoffer Molvig Photography
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#2 gwegner
In my opinion that's an example on how not to do it. Go for longer shutter times (at least half interval) to blur the fast movements of the people this will look much better.
Don't rely on post processing for this - do it right when shooting. LRT's Motion Blur Plus can help with the final touch, but cannot cure choppiness due to short shuttertimes.
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#3 Krimolvig
Hmm, right. Canyou recommend a exposure settings? What about 0"5?
And as this going to be put togheter within 60 minutes or less I would prefer quite frequently interval, would'nt I? Maybe a couple of seconds or so?
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Kristoffer Molvig Photography

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